“Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – Ultimate Edition” Blu-Ray Review

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Ultimate Edition

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – Ultimate Edition
Theatrical:
Theatrical: – for intense sequences of violence and action throughout, and some sensuality.

Ultimate Edition:
Ultimate Edition: – for sequences of violence.

Director: Zack Snyder
Starring: Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, Jeremy Irons, Gal Gadot, Holly Hunter
Running Time: 2 hours, 31 minutes (Theatrical) / 3 hours, 2 minutes (Ultimate Edition)
Theatrical Release Date: March 25, 2015
Official Site
Blu-Ray Release Date: July 19, 2016 (Amazon.com)

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Ultimate Edition

Plot Summary
Fearing the actions of Superman are left unchecked, Batman takes on the man of steel, while the world wrestles with what kind of a hero it really needs. With Batman and Superman fighting each other, a new threat, Doomsday, is created by Lex Luthor. It’s up to Superman and Batman to set aside their differences along with Wonder Woman to stop Lex Luthor and Doomsday from destroying Metropolis. (from IMDB.com)

Theatrical Version Film Review
Ever since Marvel’s Avengers smashed box office records in 2012, DC comics has wanted a piece of that blockbuster pie. It soon set in motion DC’s plans for their own cinematic universe. And with 2013’s lukewarm reception of the underrated Man of Steel, the first piece of foundation was laid. But instead of methodically building it carefully piece by piece, 2016’s Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice serves as a proverbial dump truck to unload a pile of groundwork in an effort to pave the road toward next year’s Justice League (Part One).

There’s so much packed into BvS that it’s difficult to even know where to start here. For those hoping for a sequel to Man of Steel, BvS does try to wear that hat as well, taking place 18 months after the film and showing the impact Superman’s battle with Zod had on Metropolis and the world around it. They use this as a springboard to introduce the latest Batman, now played by Ben Affleck, ushering him officially into this new DC cinematic universe. The film opens by placing Bruce Wayne in Metropolis during the epic finale of Man of Steel, and it kickstarts the caped crusader’s beef with the Kryptonian hero. The world admires and celebrates Superman now, but a staged massacre in the desert paints our hero as a villain, and it begins turning the world against Superman. And once another act of terrorism misrepresents Superman yet again, it’s the final straw that breaks the proverbial camel’s back for Batman, and the two are manipulated into facing off.

And that’s really why this movie exists, isn’t it? While it’s tough to watch two heroes try to fight to the death, there’s also something just plain exciting about it. I’m firmly on the side of Superman any time (although, admittedly, if Bale had continued as Batman into this movie, I would have been too invested in his version of the character to quickly dismiss him for a complete allegiance to Supes). But Man of Steel only cemented my good vibes towards the character of Superman, and it was certainly bittersweet to see the two engage in a knock-down, drag-out wall-smashing brawl. Frankly, their tussle is worth the price of admission alone — as it should be — even if the outcome comes to a sudden and somewhat perplexing conclusion.


As a whole, however, from start to finish, Batman v Superman is plagued with any number of problems. Was it entertaining? Oh my gosh, yes! Quite so. But is it a hot mess? Also an emphatic yes. Watching the story play out is kind of like watching a 5-year-old boy play with toys; maybe the plot is more sensical, but the ADD exhibited here in the way the story skips from one thought to the next and back again is almost dizzying. It’s a little exhausting, but in the same way two-and-a-half hours at an amusement park can be too. Superhero fans are already pretty invested in these characters, so it’s exhilarating to see a story like this unfold. But let’s not forget that Avengers had four full-length films leading up to it: Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger. These films–which varied in quality but were all still pretty good even at their “weakest”–were a thoughtful way to win audiences over and set up Avengers properly. Batman v Superman–which reintroduces Batman, introduces Wonder Woman, and tries to tease The Flash, Cyborg, and Aquaman too–is just trying too hard to play catchup to Marvel.

How do the newcomers fare? Jesse Eisenberg is entertaining as Lex Luthor, but he seldom really feels like “Lex Luthor.” My wife, Amy, pointed out that he reminded her of Heath Ledger’s Joker, and I had to agree, and then I read another article tonight that complained he was a “Joker rip-off.” While he’s nowhere near the quality of a villain or performance as Ledger’s turn as the maniacal clown, Eisenberg still seemed to be the appropriate, manipulative foil for Batman and Superman in this story–even if several moments seriously screamed “Ledger’s Joker.” Jeremy Irons has some big shoes to fill as Bruce Wayne’s Alfred, after Michael Caine turned in my favorite performance of the character. However, Irons did a more than admirable job, returning to the more techy version of the character–and he offered up some of the film’s very few laughs. And how was Ben Affleck as Batman? Just typing that concept conjurs up bad memories of the realization that George Clooney made a terrible Batman, but believe it or not, Affleck was actually quite good as an aged and experienced Batman and Bruce Wayne. I have to admit I was impressed. The silliness that Bale unintentionally brought to Batman at times (his gruff voice and dramatic enunciations, for example), were replaced with some pretty committed acting from Affleck. In some ways, he’s too good for this particular movie.

But man, the story… in trying to do too much at once, the story is all over the place. I have read some complaints that the story relies too much on convenience – like Gotham being a stone’s throw from Metropolis or that Superman has really great selective hearing for keeping Lois safe at every turn. Even the ironic fact that loner Bruce Wayne/Batman would be the catalyst for roping together the Justice League seems kind of odd. Also, with so much going on, we have Luthor playing Dr. Frankenstein to create a monster — which comic book fans are familiar with — that becomes the uber-villain for the film’s climax. It all leads up to the treatment of an iconic scenario that still packs an emotional wallop for those who are really invested in the characters, but doesn’t give the scenario the conflict or resolution it so truly deserves. It SHOULD have the same caliber and intensity as pitting Superman and Batman against each other, but it feels like it’s over far too soon after you realize what’s being set up here. It’s just poorly handled and unsatisfying (Think the way Venom was treated for Spider-Man 3 and you might start to get a feel for what I mean).


As far as content goes, Dawn of Justice is extremely dark. From beginning to end, it’s just dark, heavy and brooding. You’re having each hero hating each other for some good reasons and some really unfair reasons. There’s also a great deal of death on screen. Whether it’s a dream sequence or an actual, physical fight, we see terrorists gunning down people, Batman fighting rather brutally in hand-to-hand combat, a long car chase with explosions and vehicles getting smashed, and even another Batman movie giving viewers a flashback of Bruce’s parents’ death. And if that all isn’t enough, we even get flashbacks to these flashbacks and other violent moments. There’s very little blood seen in the movie, but we see the bat signal burned into the flesh of a couple of Batman’s victims, a man who’s lost his leg in the aftermath of city-wide destruction, a bloody cut on Superman’s cheek, Lex cutting his own hand to draw blood and other kind of rough moments (including a character who’s impaled with kind of bloody results). In addition, there is some language, with most of it being blasphemy, including 3 uses of Jesus’ name, and several of God’s (including “g*dd*mn”), and at least 1 use of the “S” word. Finally, there’s a scene where Clark talks to Lois while she sits naked in a bathtub (we see the tops of her bare breasts peeking out of the water), and then he climbs in there with her (while he’s clothed).

It’s a shame that Dawn of Justice is as muddled as it is. Director Zack Snyder uses dream sequences far too often in the film to tell parts of the story or try to establish Bruce’s motivation against Superman. From the first dream sequence where a young Bruce is carried out of a well by flying bats (which you don’t know is a dream sequence right away), to Bruce having a nightmare about a world where Superman has his own army and mows down the opposition with his heat vision, it’s just all too much. Cutting most of these dream sequences out would have made the film feel a bit less chaotic (even though one of them might be hinting at things to come in future movies, but as it is here, it’s just noise). I was also surprised to see that Batman–who spent three movies as part of Christopher Nolan’s series refusing to kill anyone–is a killer here. We see his vehicle crush and kill several villains while he shoots and stabs many others, clearly lethally too. And after having Superman breaking Zod’s neck in Man of Steel upset so many people 3 years ago, it surprises me that Snyder would choose to have Batman be a killer here too. Also, I have to mention, it’s fascinating to me that the film released on Good Friday. Lex frequently refers to Superman as a god and man battling god, and the world needing a savior. And there’s also more than one death and resurrection reference in the story. Even if it’s just a marketing ploy, it’s really curious to note the placement of this film. Even Man of Steel had blatant symbolism about Superman and relating that to faith and Jesus.

While Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is ultimately a hot mess, it was highly entertaining. However, repeat viewings could make or break the film for me. I’m curious to see if it holds up or if its shortcomings drag it down even more. If you don’t mind your superhero movies being massively flawed, you won’t want to miss this on the big screen. But if you’re hoping for a strong, well-constructed superhero epic, be a hero yourself and save your money. For parents tempted to bring the kids to this one, please be advised that it’s very violent, very dark, and not one you’ll want to take the kids to. If the violence doesn’t overwhelm them, the scary dream sequences will certainly do it.

John DiBiase, (reviewed: 3/25/16)

 

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Ultimate Edition

3D / Ultimate Edition Blu-Ray Special Features Review
Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is available in a 3D Blu-Ray/2-Disc 2D Blu-Ray/Digtial combo pack, a Blu-Ray/DVD/Digital combo pack, 2-disc DVD, and a 4K/Blu-Ray/Digital combo pack, as well as separately through the usual digital movie providers. We’re reviewing the 3D combo pack, which also includes a code to get digital copies for both the “Ultimate Edition” cut and the theatrical version.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice ULTIMATE EDITION (3 hours, 2 minutes) [Rated R] – The main draw of the “Ultimate Edition” set is the half-hour-longer new cut that adds more story (and violence) to the original theatrical cut. The film was rated PG-13 in theaters, but was given an R rating for “sequences of violence” in this Ultimate Edition. If you’re wondering how hard of an “R” it might be, it kind of varies, but for the most part, it’s not too much worse than the theatrical version. Overall, though, this extended version fills in a lot of the story that felt rushed and quickly edited otherwise. The theatrical edit suffers from A.D.D. as it skips around between characters and storylines and subplots frequently. The extra 30 minutes fills in a lot of the gaps this frantic editing created–adding explanations for things, and even creating new subplots and new characters (like the one played by Jena Malone who helps Lois out) that give audiences more from Clark Kent as he investigates Batman in Gotham or calls his mother Martha for comfort in the midst of the growing anti-Superman social climate. There’s also added dialog peppered throughout scenes that had been previously truncated. Whether it’s Batman’s final conversations with Lex Luthor and Wonder Woman, or an extended emotional finale, they’re little pieces that just strengthen what was a troubled film in theaters. The opening sequence in Africa with a terrorist attack that was used to frame Superman is much longer–and more violent–but it lends a lot more explanation to the setup the story originally was trying to make. The theatrical version showed a lot of people getting shot, but mostly off camera. Here we see more getting hit with bullets and puffs of blood squirting into the air, with a few showing bloody impact wounds or splattering against the wall behind them. The same goes for Batman’s nightmare versus the Superman-allied army, and his one-on-many fight in the warehouse later in the film is a bit more brutal (and features a little bit of added blood). Other edgier additions to the movie include one “F” word and a very brief but very unnecessary shot of Ben Affleck’s nude backside while he’s taking a shower. I’m not sure what seeing his bare butt serves to the story, but it’s been added to this cut. Honestly, though, while the added brutality to the violence was equally unneeded and doesn’t add anything to the film, the bits of story and character development really, really strengthen the film. This cut is far better than the theatrical and the one fans will make their go-to version going forward. Unfortunately, the theatrical version had hardly been suitable for kids or the whole family and this cut is even less family friendly. Here’s hoping the upcoming Justice League outing will be a bit more fun and a bit more primed for a wider age range. I tried to detail the content for the Ultimate Edition below (it’s a bit more thorough than the one I did after seeing the theatrical version), so hopefully that’ll help some trying to decide whether or not it’s worth the risk. It isn’t, however, a list of all of the changes or additions made to the film.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice in 3D (2 hours, 31 minutes) – It’s kind of a bummer now that only the theatrical version is in 3D on this edition. However, the 3D is only decent to pretty good. I’ve definitely seen better 3D films, so I’m not sure this would be worth splurging on. Still, the most fun 3D sequence is the iconic Batman versus Superman fight, so it might still be worth it for some fans.

In addition to the theatrical film on a 2D Blu-Ray disc are the following special features:

Uniting the World’s Finest (15:05) – The first featurette talks about getting Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman on screen together for the first time — and we’re treated to some footage of clips from Wonder Woman’s upcoming solo film. We then are introduced to Aquaman, Flash, Cyborg and then Suicide Squad, and learn about that villainous team.

Gods and Men: A Meeting of Giants (12:28) – Here he hear about the history of the two heroes and when they first appeared in comics together and separately. It also takes a long look into who these characters are and why they’ve endured through the years.

The Warrior, The Myth, The Wonder (21:16) is dedicated to bringing Wonder Woman to the big screen, in this film and in her upcoming 2017 solo film. It delves deep into the history of the comic book character, her stint featured in a TV show, the evolution of the character through the years, what she symbolizes, and what her future looks like.

Accelerating Design: The New Batmobile (22:46) – The designers of the new Batmobile gather to talk about conceptualizing and designing the new car. We see various testing of it functionally, and watch them test drive it through its various stages of completion. We also learn here that the car weighs a whopping 8,500 lbs! Extreme Sports Commentator Sal Masekela gets to test drive it here too and you can tell he has a blast. The featurette concludes with some behind the scenes footage of the big car chase in the film.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Ultimate Edition
Superman: Complexity & Truth (7:08) – The next three featurettes dive into the individual superheros with their costume design and characteristics. This one covers Clark Kent’s wardrobe and the new, updated Superman suit. Henry Cavill talks about the complexity of shooting the big fight with Batman in the rain as well.

Batman: Austerity & Rage (8:15) covers Bruce Wayne’s suits as well as Batman’s suit and where his comfort lies between the two. The featurette also talks about Batman’s new gadgets, Ben Affleck’s physique, and his suit designs (and the details in them).

Wonder Woman: Grace & Power (6:48) focuses on designing the suit, Gal Gadot becoming Wonder Woman, Gal’s training for the role and Wonder Woman’s various weapons.

Batcave: Legacy of the Lair (7:12) takes us to the indoor set of the new batcave and shows us how they built it in a studio. It then focuses on the technology we see inside the cave.

The Might and Power of a Punch (5:15) analyzes the first half of the fight between Batman and Superman, showing us stats of the weight of the punches and how far each character is thrown during the fight.

The Empire of Luthor (12:33) talks about the history of Lex Luthor as a character, Jesse Eisenberg’s unique portrayal, and how Doomsday comes into play in the film (and compares to his comic book version).

Save the Bats (4:37) – This short video talks about how bats are suffering (and dying out) from White Nose Syndrome, which originated in Europe and has come over to the U.S. Bats help control the bug population in our eco system and are necessary for it. They hope to raise awareness about these endangered animals and hopefully save them from extinction.

John DiBiase, (reviewed: reviewed: 7/12/16)

 

ULTIMATE EDITION – Parental Guide: Brief Summary of Content
. Sex/Nudity: Clark talks to Lois while she sits naked in a bathtub (we see the tops of her bare breasts peeking out of the water), and then he climbs in there with her while clothed. They kiss and then Clark removes his shirt as he kisses on top of her (his pants are still on). We see her hands gripping his bare back and then the scene ends; We briefly see Bruce’s full, bare backside in the shower (and therefore see his bare butt); Wonder Woman / Diana Prince often shows cleavage in her outfits ; We see part of a dead man’s naked body lying in water (nothing explicit though)

. Vulgarity/Language: 1 “F” word, 1 “S” word, 4 “g*dd*mn,” 1 “Chr-st,” 1 “J-sus Chr-st,” 2 “S.O.B,” 2 “p*ss,” 2 “d*mn,” 1 “a” word, 2 “h*ll,” 2 “J-sus,” 1 “Oh G-d”

. Alcohol/Drugs: Lois drinks wine alone before taking a bath; Lex drinks bourbon in his dad’s study and offers it to June, who declines; Bruce wakes up from a nightmare and takes a pill and washes it down with a bottle of alcohol; People have champagne and drinks at a party (Lex talks about there being an open bar; We see Alfred drinking

. Blood/Gore: Bruce’s mom’s face has blood on it as she lies on the ground dying in a flashback; We see some dark blood on a man’s pant legs as he’s pulled out from underneath a steel beam. Later we see he has lost the lower part of his legs; Some terrorists shoot people in an African village. Blood squirts into the air as they are shot. Some blood splatters on the wall behind victims. In a couple instances, we see some bloody bullet wounds as people are shot. They then pile up the dead bodies and burn them with a flame thrower. We later see the charred remains of the torched dead bodies; We see a bad guy with the bat logo branded onto his skin. He has blood on his chest and coming from his mouth; Lois finds dried blood on her shirt from Africa; We briefly see a newspaper image of the bat-logo-branded victim; We briefly see a video monitor of a blade using Kryptonite to slice Zod’s skin. We briefly see a red cut line from a distance; We then see a closeup of them slicing thin skin from Zod’s fingertips; We see blood on a streetfighter’s cheek; In a dream, Bruce touches black blood that’s coming out of his parents’ gravestone and a huge bat monster attacks him; We see a prisoner with blood on his cheek; In Bruce’s dream where Superman-allied soldiers attack him, we see some blood squirting when they are shot. Bruce also dreams that Superman uses his laser vision to fry and burn up other prisoners; We see Polaroids of a branded criminal with a closeup of the burned Batman logo into his skin and the man’s swollen face; After the Capitol bombing, we see a victim with blood on her face while lying on a stretcher. We see some other victims with blood on them. Superman surveys the damage and sees body bags lining the ground; Lex slices his own hand with a knife to make it bleed onto the face of a dead corpse; We see half of Cyborg’s body as it’s strapped to life support. As such, we see his bare chest just missing at the abdomen; Bruce has some scrapes on his face after battles during the movie; Superman has a bloody cut on his cheek; We see Superman’s deformed and shrivelled appearance as he float’s in space after being hit with a nuclear missile. Doomsday falls back to Earth, rips off a layer of skin, revealing more spikes; Wonder Woman cuts off Doomsday’s arm, which grows back with one big spike; A character is impaled in the chest and we see some blood from this. The victim them pulls himself along the thing that impaled him, pulling it through his body (we see a wider shot of this than in the theatrical); There’s an added scene of Luther standing in a pool of blood communicating with an alien.

. Violence: LOTS of action violence. In a dream, we see young Bruce running at funeral outside. He falls down a hole and, as he’s falling, has flashbacks of his parents being robbed and shot to death. It’s all shown in slow motion with closeups of the gun going off and the bullet flying from the chamber; Adult Bruce arrives in Metropolis and witnesses the climactic event from Man of Steel where the world engine is terraforming and destroying Metropolis. Bruce drives recklessly through the streets with buildings being destroyed around him. We see an aerial view of the Kryptonian ship sliding through buildings, causing much destruction. We also see Zod and Superman fighting from a distance, tearing through buildings. Bruce runs into a cloud of smoke as a Wayne building (containing employees in his company) collapses. He finds one of them outside with a beam crushing their legs. The man, named Wally, is freaking out about not being able to feel his legs; Bruce saves a girl from being crushed under debris as it falls; In Africa, some terrorists take and smash Jimmy’s camera and film. They then shoot Jimmy and surrounding people in the village. Blood squirts as people are shot. Some blood splatters on the wall behind victims. In a couple instances, we see some bloody bullet wounds as people are shot. One man throws a grenade into a tank and it explodes. They then pile up the dead bodies and burn them with a flame thrower; Superman blasts through a rocket and drone and smashes a bad guy through a wall. We then see the aforementioned charred remains of the torched dead bodies; We see footage on TV of two football teams briefly arguing and fighting; A cop shoots at Batman with a shotgun and almost shoots another cop accidentally. We then see a bad guy with the bat logo branded onto his skin. He has blood on his chest and coming from his mouth; We briefly see a newspaper image of the bat-logo-branded victim; We briefly see a video monitor of a blade using Kryptonite to slice Zod’s skin. We briefly see a red cut line from a distance; We then see a closeup of them slicing thin skin from Zod’s fingertips; Bruce attends an
underground street fight. He whispers in one fighter’s ear and then the man punches out his opponent; In a dream, Bruce touches black blood that’s coming out of his parents’ gravestone and a huge bat monster attacks him; Superman rescues a girl from a burning building; A prisoner is cornered in the prison courtyard and another inmate rapidly stabs the man in the stomach area (off camera), killing him; Bruce has a dream that shows desolation and fires everywhere. Armed vehicles approach him, as he wears his Bat suit. Armed Superman-allied soldiers shoot at Batman and other thugs nearby, and Batman fights them and shoots them (Blood spatters when they’re shot). They then overpower and beat on Batman and and then punch him out. In the same dream, he finds himself tied up with other prisoners and Superman shows up. Superman fries the other guys with his laser eyes and then pushes his hand through Batman’s chest (off screen), and Bruce wakes up; We see Polaroids of a branded criminal with a closeup of the burned Batman logo into his skin and the man’s swollen face; The Batmobile crashes a car then pulls it behind it. It then releases it to crash into another car. The pursuit continues, meanwhile, big machine guns fire back at Batman. He shoots up one of them and it blows up. There are several explosions throughout the chase, and other destruction. He then crashes into Superman who rips off the top of the car; We briefly see some flashbacks of the shooting in Africa; A thug pushes a woman in front of an oncoming train, killing her; A large explosion tears through the Capitol, killing lots of people in a ball of fire. Superman tries to rescue some of the victims; After the Capitol bombing, we see a victim with blood on her face while lying on a stretcher. We see some other victims with blood on them. Superman surveys the damage and sees body bags lining the ground; Victims are shown being wheeled out on gurneys at Lexcorp; We see a montage scene of Bruce training, including banging a sledgehammer on tire, pulling weights, dropping weights and making weapons; Lex slices his own hand with a knife to make it bleed onto the face of a dead corpse; Lois gets grabbed and thrown into a van; Lex pushes a woman off a building, but Superman saves her; We see photos of a woman bound and gagged; We see surveillance footage of the Flash smashing a convenience store robber, stopping him; Aquaman lunges at the camera, destroying it; We see half of Cyborg’s body as it’s strapped to life support. Some kind of matter then adheres to him and we see him screaming in pain; We see large machine guns shooting at Superman, who just blocks them. He pushes Batman, who goes flying pretty far. The two then fight — punching, kicking and throwing each other. Batman uses Kryptonite to weaken Superman and then hits him in the head repeatedly and drops him from a great distance. He even hits in the head with a sink, and holds him down with his boot to his throat; Machine guns fire on the Batwing and it fires back, blowing up some trucks; Batman takes on a room full of thugs, punching, kicking, tossing them, banging one guy’s head into the floor, throwing another against the wall, breaking some arms and we see the elbow bend the opposite direction. One guy is hit with a wire through the shoulder and then thrown when another guy is hung upside down and yet another guy is blown up off screen by his own grenade. Near the end of the fight, he stabs a man in the shoulder and then grabs it while it’s still in his body (that part is not in the theatrical); A man holds a woman hostage at the end of a flamethrower. Batman shoots it so it explodes (killing the guy) and protects her with his cape; The climactic battle involves Lex creating a “Kryptonian deformity” called Doomsday, which destroys buildings, vehicles, and beats up Superman and Batman. At one point, Superman takes Doomsday into space and the U.S. Army tries to nuke him. Doomsday falls back to Earth, rips off a layer of skin, revealing more spikes, and then continues to fight. Wonder Woman then shows up to help out; A woman almost drowns but Superman saves her; We see some huge explosions during the fight; A character is impaled in the chest and we see some blood from this. The victim them pulls himself along the thing that impaled him, pulling it through his body (we see a wider shot of this than in the theatrical).

 

Theatrical Version – Parental Guide: Brief Summary of Content
. Sex/Nudity: Clark talks to Lois while she sits naked in a bathtub (we see the tops of her bare breasts peeking out of the water), and then he climbs in there with her while clothed; We see part of a dead man’s naked body lying in water (nothing explicit though)

. Vulgarity/Language: (A guess-timate) 1 “S” word, 2 “S.O.B,” 1 “J-sus Chr-st,” 2 “J-sus,” 1 “Chr-st,” 3 “G-d,” 2 “g*dd*mn,” 1 “d*mn,” 1 “h*ll,” 1 “p*ss”

. Alcohol/Drugs: Lex and some other characters have drinks during the movie; Some people have drinks at a banquet.

. Blood/Gore: Bruce’s mom’s face has blood on it as she lies on the ground dying in a flashback; We see some dark blood on a man’s pant legs as he’s pulled out from underneath a steel beam. Later we see he has lost the lower part of his legs; Bruce has some scrapes on his face after battles during the movie; Superman has a bloody cut on his cheek; Lex slices his own hand with a knife to make it bleed onto the face of a dead corpse; Lex uses a thin blade to remove finger prints from a dead body; A character is impaled in the chest and we see some blood from this; In a dream, Bruce touches black blood that’s coming out of his parents’ gravestone and a huge bat attacks him.

. Violence: LLOTS of action violence. The film opens with a flashback of Bruce’s parents getting shot and killed by a mugger (possibly even in the face); Bruce dreams he fell down a well as a young boy; Bruce witnesses the brawl between Zod and Superman that causes mass hysteria and destruction in Metropolis. As such, we see many buildings getting cut down and falling. We also see the “world engine” in action. Bruce saves a child from falling debris and helps save a man who’s pinned under a beam. We see a building fall that has some of Wayne’s employees inside; A man and woman are taken captive in the desert. When one is outed as CIA, he’s shot in the head off screen. Other men are then shot up and Superman shows up, busting through a building’s ceiling to rescue Lois. He then barrels her attacker through a wall; We see a man chained to a radiator in a building; Batman dreams of a world where an army works for Superman and they fight him. We see him kicking, shooting, punching, stabbing and even breaking the neck of them. We then see winged creatures fly down and attack them. Superman shows up and cuts down a bunch of bad guys with his heat vision; A room explodes very suddenly and shockingly, killing everyone inside of it; Bruce dreams that a monster or very large bat bursts through a grave and attacks him; Batman and Superman have a brutal fight where they punch and hit each other and throw each other through walls; An older woman is seen tied up with a bomb set to go off; Batman attacks a room full of armed thugs and fights them in a violent brawl where he shoots and stabs them as they attack him and he breaks the arm (or dislocates the shoulder) of one of them; A man with a flame thrower is shot and the tank explodes; A huge monster attacks buildings and vehicles; A large nuke goes off in space; A character is impaled during a fight; and lots, lots more action violence.

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